Our Kids and Stuff

We took a look around and saw that our house is crawling with toys. The funny thing is that Darth only consistently plays with a few toys. He loves his Bruder construction vehicles, Hess Trucks, Hot Wheels, remote controlled monster truck, and Legos. Other new toys get about 15 minutes of play before they end up in a junk bin stashed in the basement. We had about five if these junk bin filled with pieces of toys, little shit toys like you’d get in a happy meal. 

We made a deal with our son that if he donate or sold what was in those junk bins that he barely blayed with, he could buy one nice toy that he would really like. 

He went for it and we got rid of several of those toy bins. He got the remote controlled monster truck that we like playing with together. We bring it on walks in the neighborhood and in the woods at the park. He has something he really gets use out of instead of the trinket toys. The hard part is getting other people to stop bringing this stuff into our house. 

It was a good way to consolidate‚Äč. Less clutter feels better. 

Our Kids and Money

We have had a few different plans and oddly enough, the unplanned is what seemed to make the most sense to young Vader. 

He enjoyed played a computer game with me where you have to win events like racing your vehicle, doing stunts off of jumps with it, and collecting coins. You are able to “level up” your vehicle to make it faster and handle better and you also have the ability to buy new ones and many times you have to earn a certain amount of points before you can unlock the next one. Then you also have to have enough money to buy that new vehicle. 

In the beginning, he‚Äč didn’t understand why he couldn’t just get the firetruck. It was right there. He could see it and saw other people driving it in the game.  Everytime, I explained that we didn’t have enough money and showed him how we earned the money and how much we had in the “bank.” Soon he started asking me if we had enough money to buy the next vehicle in the game and I could see that he was putting it together. 

Making the transition to real money was easy. He knows that he has $11 and now we are working on him not wanting everything in the store and on YouTube. 

If someone told me that they used a videogame to try to teach their kid about money, I probably would have thought it was a bad idea, but, whatever works.